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Cris Price, Paractical Boxing

Chris Price

Listen to Chris Price talking about some PRACTICAL BOXING principles.


In this clip taken from a training session, Chris Price, talks about the evolution of boxing and the impact that gloves have had on the sport.


Before gloves were introduced, fighters would punch with their fists facing upwards, resulting in brutal cuts and damage to their opponents.


However, once gloves were mandated in the sport, the technique changed and fighters started punching with their fists turned downwards.


The reason for this change, as Price explains, is that the gloves made it difficult to inflict damage on the opponent's face, as it provided extra padding and protection. Thus, fighters had to adjust their technique to make their punches more effective.


This is where the twist punch, which involves turning the fist over after impact, originated. Price notes that there is no other reason for this technique other than to get cuts on the opponent's face.


Despite this, many fighters today still adhere to the idea that turning over the punch gives them more power and range. Price disputes this claim, stating that there is no noticeable difference in power between the two techniques.


Furthermore, Price advocates for the old English way of punching, which involves keeping the fist facing upwards to protect the hand from damage. This technique is especially important for bare-knuckle boxing, and street fights.


And then clinch, dirty boxing and wrestling, Price also shares some tips for gaining a tactical advantage in a fight.


He recommends getting to a T position, where one stands to the side of the opponent, as it is a superior position for striking.


Additionally, he emphasizes the importance of not letting the opponent stumble back after a move, but rather staying close to maintain control.


Overall, Price's insights offer a fascinating perspective on the history and techniques of boxing, as well as practical advice for those looking to improve their fighting skills.